Banks

“800,000 people had been murdered in one of the most extensive mobilisations of a population against its fellow citizens ever seen” (src)

In June 1994, in the midst of an arms embargo against Rwanda, one of the biggest banks in the world — BNP Paribas  accepted a request made by the National Bank of Rwanda.

By doing so, this French bank may have transferred funds that helped war criminals buy the weapons that were used in the Rwandan genocide.

Without the crucial funds transfer that BNP authorized, 80 tons of weapons would probably never have been delivered to Rwanda and would consequently not have been used to perpetrate the genocide of 800,000 Tutsis, many of whom were women and children.

src: https://www.theguardian.com/world/2008/dec/18/rwanda-genocide-theoneste-bagosora

distribution

the access-rights to ressources = distribution of ressources should make some sense.

so in linux – it is not dependend on your bank-account – if you may have more or less access to ressources or if you should be allowed to run tasks with elevated privileges (modify the system = pass a law) – it is solely based on the question:

  • Why should this user have those privileges?
  • Does it make sense to allow user X access to those ressources?
    • depending on the user’s intentionts and if it’s good for the system or not

it does not answer the question – are those sources renewable… and would it make sense to change to renewable sources… (that is a question of mankind’s survival as a species) it just asks the question of distribution:

how should access to ressources be distributed to make everyone be able to complete their tasks within a certain time-range…

security and trust

also true:

  • systems can be hacked
  • banks and tax-advicers are constantly (day and night) on the search for such “holes” to avoid tax or even extract money from the system
  • whenever a bitcoin exchange get’s hacked – the USD/EUR value of the bitcoins goes down – trust is lost – probably the same with EUR/USD?

transparency

atleast with open source and linux – if you learn c – you could read the code.

which means – you get insight what rules the machine is operating with.

with the monetary system those rules seem not to be so clear.

mistakes can be found everywhere – so transparency would be good if the intention was to build a good system that serves everybody.

right now – you can’t visit a website money-flow.org that shows the flow of money in realtime…

in sweden you can atleast google the income of your neighbour… but that’s about it.

secrecy is high priority in banks.