News & Articles

In this article, i explain why globalization and free trade, the Euro, the Euro-Zone is increasing unemployment, by making big companies even bigger, killing small companies in the process but never absorbing the work force of those small companies.

Self driving vehicles will kill -3.5 mio truck driver and -1 mio bus and taxi driver jobs

No matter how positive you might think about these details. For society they are BAD, BAD, BAD. More unemployment means more crime, although those drivers could focus on the “skills of tomorrow”  and do what machines can not do: develop their creativity and empathy. While i would like to see more truck drivers with empathy, You must be f****ing kidding me?

(src: datausa.io, alltrucking.com)

It’s not a secret.

A lot of companies not only Tesla, Uber and Mercedes are working heavily on autopilots for cars and trucks.

They spend an awful lot of developing them and a few deadly accidents later, let’s say in 2030 – trucks and taxis could be without human driver.

What if those 2.5Mio truck drivers hate self-driving trucks and hit the breaks on robots and block highways – this is what i call disruption – i would understand them, after all, they lose it all and gain nothing – because they do not possess the robots that will replace them.

Not okay: “Joe we will replace you with a robot by 2030”

Somewhat okay, but unrealistic, would need gov intervention: “Joe we will replace you with a robot by 2030, but keep paying you half the salary”

China gov subsidies robot research and development, “255 robots that can work around the clock”

they are used to sort parcels to districts and already replaced 60 human workers

“Simple manual jobs” vanish and new jobs are created in robotics.

… well do you spot a problem here? People hat handle parcels might not be capable of programing robots (who is?).

And once a robot is programed even the programmer himself/herself becomes “obsolete”.

This clearly leads to a way of life that creates unemployment on a massive scale and in-debts private households, because if humans labor (manual or sophisticated) is not needed anymore – what else can they trade with the rest of “free markets”?

Nothing. They have nothing to trade.

Economy 4.0 needs Society 4.0 and LifeStyle 4.0 which would need redistribution of rights and privileges 4.0 or face ever growing disaster

From a mankind perspective – this is economically unsustainable – in the current system – in any universe – unless the robots are owned by all people.

or: the people do not need to work because the robots produce fresh vegetables for them FOR FREE in their own garden (THEY OWN THE GARDEN not Amazon!) and produce their own fresh water (not Nestle!) and produce their own electricity (not another company).

2016: Company China buys German manufacturing robots company Kuka

Automation is a technological solution that – at first sight – solve a problem – while under the current rule set of the system increases inequality and creates even bigger problems that were there in the first place (crime) – but were smaller.

While human level robots that would automate tasks such as elderly care taking, are still a thing of the future, but companies are never the less working on it and in 2050 – grandmum will be dealing with robots and robots only.

That would be a very sad future.

2016: “FRANKFURT (Reuters) – China’s Midea (000333.SZ) said it will complete its takeover of German robotics maker Kuka (KU2G.DE) in the first half of January after the United States authorities gave the deal a green light.

Midea, which launched a 4.5 billion euro ($5 billion) offer for Kuka in May, said Germany’s markets regulator had approved the settlement of the transaction, allowing it to control a 94.55 percent voting stake in Kuka from January onwards.” (src: reuters.com)

Artificial Intelligence:

manufacturers and logistic companies, hope to save even more jobs and money with AI.

creativity and empathy are the “skills” of tomorrow

now who in the future 4.0 will pay me the unemployed 4.0 for empathy and creativity?

(i don’t know, maybe an government 4.0)

…when you live in the “unemployment per default” future… or maybe unemployment needs to be redefined? But then also private properties and barb wires will have to go… unlikely to happen under the current mindset… i wonder when Mr Bezos (Amazon, richest man) will buy the world and all it’s resources (especially water) and rent it to us SLAVES… what he already does?  That was fast.

“we will make life easier for our workers and our customers”

… the only reasonable use of robots i can see right now: CLEAN UP THIS PLANET! START WITH FUKUSHIMA NUCLEAR WASTE! DAMN IT!

“Russia is an important country. It is a military superpower – in order for us to solve many big problems around the world – it is in our interest – to work with Russia and obtain their cooperation”

“We all hope for a successful Russia, where people have jobs and economy is growing”

“A Russia that has good relationships with their neighbors”

“I sought a constructive relationship with Russia despite significant differences” (Obama Nov 2016)

Joint Press Conference Obama Merkel White House Nov 17 2016

Trump was elected November 9, 2016

a great speech. now USA is “leader” not in climate change but in:

  • weapons exports (always was)
  • nationalism
  • racism

… but even Trump realized, that ObamaCare has to stay if he does not want to risk ripping USA completely apart. (to the amusement of Russia, China and Iran)

very good speech Mr Obama

To the young people: “Do not take for granted our systems of government and our way of life”

“because we have lived in an era that has largely been peaceful and stable – at least in developed countries”

“their is a tendency to assume that this will be always the case”

“democracy is hard work”

“in the US if 43% of voters do not vote – then democracy is weakened”

“if we are not serious about facts and whats true and whats not – if we can not discriminate between serious arguments and propaganda – then we have problems”

You are an intellectual – and that is something positive!

You and Ex-President of Russia Medvedev got along very well.

We just can hope that Mr Trump and Mr Putin get along as well.

… the voice of the female translator for Merkel IS HORRIBLE! HORRIBLE! HORRIBLE! X-D

Mrs Merkel’s days are also numbered

Neither Merkel nor Obama were able to “turn the tide” of decades of corruption and hijacking of democracy by rich entities and turning democracies actually in plutocracies with puppet politicians – that take the first bribe offer they can get.

Sorry to say but Mrs Merkel actually did not make a move known to me to bring about change to this corrupt and lobby driven “democracy” that Germany has become, globalization and open borders + refugees from Middle-East and Africa have illegally entered Europe and Mrs Merkel was only able to hit the handbrake and now globalization is reversed.

Mr Obama took some chances (ObamaCare) to make a difference.

… still 40% of all Americans can not afford a doctor.

Mrs Merkel tried to make a difference for peace in Minsk.

… but the Ukraine conflict rages on and Trump almost leaves out no possibility to bully other countries and NATO.

Unfortunately i have to say, that the lobby driven democracies failed on bold changes on behalf of the “poor” 90%.

So 90% of people around the globe get the feeling – no matter who they vote for – nothing changes – they have no voice plus politics and politicians are creating more problems than solving any – often saying one thing but in effect causing the exact opposite.

Multiple German Finance Ministers – for example –  were so incompetent, that they did not realize, they lost more than 32 BILLION (!!!) Euros to private international banks that conducted massive CumEx tax fraud schemes.

The constant plundering of the planet and people by the rich self declared “elite” plus refugees (more people coming from even poorer countries to Europe and USA and compete with the poor that already live there) is asking for escalation and violence.

Hurray! More human trafficking ads on Twitter!

So what do you think?

have they screwed up or not?

lave a comment below.

Tweets:

https://twitter.com/hashtag/obama?f=tweets&vertical=default

https://twitter.com/hashtag/germany?f=tweets&vertical=default

(Stockholm, 11 March 2019) The volume of international transfers of major arms in 2014–18 was 7.8 per cent higher than in 2009–13 and 23 per cent higher than in 2004–2008, according to new data on arms transfers published today by the Stockholm International Peace Research Institute (SIPRI).

The five largest exporters in 2014–18 were

  • United States
  • Russia
  • France
  • Germany
  • China

Together, they accounted for 75 per cent of the total volume of arms exports in 2014–18. The flow of arms increased to the Middle East between 2009–13 and 2014–18, while there was a decrease in flows to all other regions.

The gap between the USA and other arms exporters widens

US arms exports grew by 29 per cent between 2009–13 and 2014–18, and the US share of total global exports rose from 30 per cent to 36 per cent. The gap between the top two arms-exporting states also increased: US exports of major arms were 75 per cent higher than Russia’s in 2014–18, while they were only 12 per cent higher in 2009–13. More than half (52 per cent) of US arms exports went to the Middle East in 2014–18.

‘The USA has further solidified its position as the world’s leading arms supplier,’ says Dr Aude Fleurant, Director of the SIPRI Arms and Military Expenditure Programme. ‘The USA exported arms to at least 98 countries in the past five years; these deliveries often included advanced weapons such as combat aircraft, short-range cruise and ballistic missiles, and large numbers of guided bombs.’

Arms exports by Russia decreased by 17 per cent between 2009–13 and 2014–18, in particular due to the reduction in arms imports by India and Venezuela. Between 2009–13 and 2014–18 France increased its arms exports by 43 per cent and Germany by 13 per cent. The combined arms exports of European Union member states accounted for 27 per cent of global arms exports in 2014–18.

A small number of countries outside Europe and North America are large arms exporters. China was the fifth largest arms exporter in 2014–18. Whereas Chinese arms exports rose by 195 per cent between 2004–2008 and 2009–13, they increased by only 2.7 per cent between 2009–13 and 2014–18. Israeli, South Korean and Turkish arms exports increased substantially—60 per cent, 94 per cent and 170 per cent, respectively—between 2009–13 and 2014–18.

Middle Eastern arms imports almost double in the past five years

Arms imports by states in the Middle East increased by 87 per cent between 2009–13 and 2014–18 and accounted for 35 per cent of global arms imports in 2014–18. Saudi Arabia became the world’s largest arms importer in 2014–18, with an increase of 192 per cent compared with 2009–13. Arms imports by Egypt, the third largest arms importer in 2014–18, tripled (206 per cent) between 2009–13 and 2014–18. Arms imports by Israel (354 per cent), Qatar (225 per cent) and Iraq (139 per cent) also rose between 2009–13 and 2014–18. However, Syria’s arms imports fell by 87 per cent.

‘Weapons from the USA, the United Kingdom and France are in high demand in the Gulf region, where conflicts and tensions are rife,’ says Pieter D. Wezeman, Senior Researcher with the SIPRI Arms and Military Expenditure Programme. ‘Russia, France and Germany dramatically increased their arms sales to Egypt in the past five years.’

 

Asia and Oceania remains the largest importer region

States in Asia and Oceania received 40 per cent of global arms imports in 2014–18, but there was a decrease of 6.7 per cent compared with 2009–13. The top five arms importers in the region were India, Australia, China, South Korea and Viet Nam.

Australia became the world’s fourth largest arms importer in 2014–18 after its arms imports increased by 37 per cent compared with 2009–13. Indian arms imports decreased by 24 per cent between 2009–13 and 2014–18. Russia accounted for 58 per cent of India’s arms imports in 2014–18. Chinese arms imports decreased, but it was still the world’s sixth largest arms importer in 2014–18.

‘India has ordered a large number of major arms from foreign suppliers; however, deliveries are severely delayed in many cases,’ says Siemon T. Wezeman, Senior Researcher with the SIPRI Arms and Military Expenditure Programme. ‘In contrast, Chinese arms imports decreased because China has been more successful in designing and producing its own modern weaponry.’

 

Other notable developments:

  • Between 2009–13 and 2014–18 arms imports decreased by states in the Americas (–36 per cent), in Europe (–13 per cent), and in Africa (–6.5 per cent).
  • Algeria accounted for 56 per cent of African imports of major arms in 2014–18. Most other states in Africa import very few major arms.
  • The top five arms importers in sub-Saharan Africa were Nigeria, Angola, Sudan, Cameroon and Senegal. Together, they accounted for 56 per cent of arms imports to the subregion.
  • Between 2009–13 and 2014–18 British arms exports increased by 5.9 per cent. In 2014–18 a total of 59 per cent of British arms exports went to the Middle East, the vast bulk of which was made up of deliveries of combat aircraft to Saudi Arabia and Oman.
  • Venezuelan arms imports fell by 83 per cent between 2009–13 and 2014–18.
  • China delivered major arms to 53 countries in 2014–18, compared with 41 in 2009–13 and 32 in 2004–2008. Pakistan was the main recipient (37 per cent) in 2014–18, as it has been for all five-year periods since 1991.

 

For editors

The SIPRI Arms Transfers Database contains information on all international transfers of major arms (including sales, gifts and production licences) to states, international organizations and armed non-state groups from 1950 to the most recent full calendar year, 2018. SIPRI data reflects the volume of deliveries of arms, not the financial value of the deals. As the volume of deliveries can fluctuate significantly year-on-year, SIPRI presents data for five-year periods, giving a more stable measure of trends.

 

For information or interview requests contact Alexandra Manolache (alexandra.manolache@sipri.org, +46 766 286 133) or Stephanie Blenckner (blenckner@sipri.org, +46 8 655 97 47).